CBF™ Explained

Because the Instant Center fluctuates so much on most multi-link bikes, there is a very small sweet spot where the bike pedals efficiently. This is the reason most suspension designs have a recommended sag setting.

*The red lines in the illustrations represents the movement of the Instant Center through travel.

*The red lines in the illustrations represents the movement of the Instant Center through travel.


 

This is in part because the IC is the focal point in configuring most suspension designs. In the grand mechanical scheme of things, mountain bike suspension is relatively new technology. Certain truths and methodology—such as designing around the IC—came from existing designs, such as motorcycles and other chain-driven suspension vehicles. We can all agree that there are a lot of similarities between mountain bikes and motorcycles, but there is one very big difference: the motor.

We humans make very sloppy and inconsistent motors. Our power delivery is far from smooth and constant, especially over the kind of terrain we typically encounter on mountain bikes.

The IC is a key piece of the puzzle, but there is another very important yet often overlooked part of the equation.

In multi-link bikes, the IC constantly changes for any given point in suspension travel, and the rear wheel is no longer rotating on a perfect arc like a single pivot. But if you were to connect that rear axle’s location at any point on its path with that ever-changing IC, the area where all those lines intersect for the entire range of travel would be the Center of Curvature. This is the “virtual pivot point” around which the rear wheel actually rotates (On most bikes, it’s a fairly large area). On most multilink bikes, the CC changes location as the rear wheel moves through travel, sometimes over an area as large as several square feet.

*The red lines in the illustrations represents the movement of Center of Curvature through travel.

*The red lines in the illustrations represents the movement of Center of Curvature through travel.


 

Versatile. Smooth. Efficient.

The CC serves as a tipping point in the balance of drivetrain and suspension forces and there’s a very small sweet spot in the bike’s travel where optimal pedaling and suspension characteristics are present.

So what if we took what we know about suspension, and Balanced it with the drivetrain forces created by this inconsistent human motor?

The patented Canfield Balance Formula focuses the CC precisely in a very finite area on the chainline/top of the chainring, pointing the pedaling forces directly into the IC throughout the entire range of travel, creating the most efficient yet active pedaling platform possible, completely independent of sag, travel and both drivetrain and braking forces.

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